Lies for Money

I received an email just a bit ago of the political donation variety. It’s worth mentioning that a few years ago I guess I ended up on a Scott Walker mailing list. I’m not entirely sure how that happened, but it did.

Before I unsubscribed this morning, I actually read the email and there were two things that stood out to me. First, this:

The governor emailed me early this morning specifically asking for your help before the end of the month.

Did he, now? Does he even know who I am? Given I haven’t given him a dollar in the history of ever, I wonder why he was so interested in me.

The mass email was a “forward” of the “email” that Scott Walker “sent” via his “iPhone.” I put all those words in quotes because I don’t think it actually happened.

The second line was amusing, too, and made me chuckle:

Colleen, I’ve been reviewing grassroots leaders in the 98036 zip code and I don’t have Johnathan’s contact info. Will you please send them a message asking for an urgent contribution before the end of the month? We really need them on our team.

Let me know as soon as you hear from Johnathan.

Thanks!

So you’re trying to get money from me by making me believe that Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin actually emailed you, citing me, and a zip code I don’t live in, on purpose? Because I’ve given zero dollars, I’m somehow probably good for donating a bunch of cash on short notice?

Pretty weak, but then again, this is American PoliticsTM for you.

Conquering the Dev Career

If you asked me how I felt about this topic a few years ago, I would have told you it’s dumb. If you asked me how I felt about becoming a software developer, I would have told you I’d never do it, it’s not something I find interesting. If you told me that we could fast forward three years and my tone would be different, I would have laughed in your face.

Well, here we are, three years later. I’m slowly starting to entertain development-related career paths. It’s an uphill battle, for sure, and it’ll take quite a bit of time to work out, but I see a future ahead of me that I didn’t see before. One thing that’s different about now is where I live. Here in Silicon Valley, software is everything. No one gives two shits about hardware because it’s become so heavily commoditized. The homeless guy pushing his shopping cart down the street right now probably has a DigitalOcean account and is stealthily building his startup.

At no point am I saying “me too” when it comes to making an app or building a thing. I do, however, like building things, and software helps me do that. I can still draw upon my roots in this new space but it’s important for me to be open and ready to experience.

The next year is going to be interesting.

Upgrading to SSL

One thing I never did when I moved my blog to john.ly and away from jlyman.net was to add SSL. I had SSL set up and running on jlyman.net purely because of the low cost of entry. At $10/year, basic SSL gives great HTTPS encryption. Privacy is important, and while I don’t take or give sensetive personal information, it’s still a nice thing to have.

I added SSL to this domain last week and am thinking I made a great choice. Every site I fire up from now on will have it. It’s hard to say no at $10 a year… I think I waste more than that on crap I end up throwing away.

Dump Flash

Apple World Today has a quick piece on dumping flash. If you need it, I feel bad for you. If you don’t need it, get rid of it. Adobe Flash has been riddled with holes almost since day one and has never gotten better. It’s 2015 and with the level of intricacy front-end UI frameworks provide, there’s no need for it. Flash needs to go away for good.

If you’re like me, you’ve already dumped it. I keep Google Chrome around just in case and if Flash is an absolute must.

Eleven Million

The first numbers for Apple Music are in and it’s an interesting amount. From Marco Cava at USA Today:

So the estimates of 10 million floating around last week were in the right neighborhood. Of course, 11 million users who aren’t actually handing over any money doesn’t really mean much at this point—now Apple has to retain those users after the remaining two months of the free trial are up.

I have your answer: make it worth their money. It’s easy to get eleven million people to sign up for something they can get for free with you but have to pay for, elsewhere. The key will be if the level of frustration coming from some has more or less weight than the idea of being able to use a first party app that ties in with your regular iTunes library.