Desk 1.2

I am super stoke to see Desk reach version 1.2. I’m also stoked to see a bunch of stuff fixed or improved that I was itching for!

I’ve been a user of desk for the last month and change, and I’m still really enjoying the app. It’s simple and it practically forces me to think about writing first. A couple of the biggest changes that I was looking forward to were the ability to adjust view amount of screen real estate being used for text (and the fact that it’s adjustable), and the spacing between paragraphs has been fixed. The issue surrounding odd spacing showing up in the editor when text was stylized seems to be fixed, too, which is a nice plus!

If you’re not a Desk user, go download it now. It’s $30 on the Mac App Store and well worth the price!


Just Sit Down and Write with Desk

I’ve been writing pretty religiously for the last few weeks now—I officially started this new chapter on January 6th—and one thing I’ve failed to talk much about is what exactly I do my writing on. I could go into a huge, winded preamble about how the best software matters and this and that and the other thing, but I’ll spare you the sappy crap. The reality is, I have one app I use when I’m at my desk, tapping away at my keyboard, making words appear in sentence form on a screen. It’s called Desk. Yes, I use my computer on my desk, but on my computer is Desk. Boy that would be confusing if English wasn’t your first language. Anyway, without sounding two advertorial—sorry not sorry—I want to tell you a bit about the app.

Desk is a minimalist writing app. To say it’s minimalist might not actually be the right word for it. It’s more of a digital, software-based representation of a spiral notebook. See, Desk serves one purpose: be that guy you always go to when you need to talk about some stuff write. It allows you to be as distraction-free as possible and maintain a sense of organization and being “with it.”

Desk supports most of the popular platforms as of version 1.1:

  • WordPress
  • Blogger
  • Tumblr
  • Facebook Notes
  • Typepad
  • Squarespace
  • MovableType

Platforms such as Ghost are hopefully coming soon!

Publishing a post to any of your blogging platforms of choice takes but a few seconds, and with the option of enabling Quick Publish, it becomes a one-click setup. If you write the same type of content every day, this becomes a no brainer.

All articles you write can be saved to your iCloud Drive, along with anywhere else on your Mac. This is great if you start work on one Mac and finish on another (say at home and work). Your work travels with you from computer to computer.

The Desk on screen editor works in two ways: Markdown (awesome) or HTML (awesome, too.) With HTML mode off, the final formatting can be displayed in a separate preview window. If you’re good with Markdown, you’ll really enjoy writing with Desk.

Let’s not forget one important feature. Desk might be just a text-centric writing application, but that doesn’t stop it from being able to edit existing posts published to your platforms. From the side menu—where you do almost everything—you can select an existing post to work on or update without ever having to launch your browser or log into an admin page on your site.

This might not have been a super in-depth look at the tool and to be honest, a deep dive wouldn’t have been necessary. Yeah, it has all the basic stuff most text editors have, but on the flip side, it’s that way on purpose. It’s not trying to be an end-all writing app for everyone. It’s not meant for screenwriters (although I’m sure you could use it for that, if you wanted… no one’s stopping you) or authors of books. Desk is meant for the Web and blogging. If you’re someone, like me, who likes to write every day and push their thoughts to a blog, this is your deal. At $30 on the Mac App Store, it’s worth every penny.


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