Fire Alarms Need Junk Mail, Too

Not really, but AT&T seems to think otherwise.

I’m not sure what’s worse: that AT&T mailed this to our FACP (Fire Alarm Control Panel) room in our building or that the United States Postal Service put it in my mailbox like I’m the caretaker for all FACP mail.


On the Bus in the Fog Unlike a Dog on a Log in a Bog with Nog

This is the first time I’ve tried to write a post on the bus. There’s a lot of free time to be had on the bus, that I could just waste reading ArsTechnica articles or scrolling Facebook. But after my recap on the finicky relationship I have with my iPhone I feel like it’s necessary to look into putting it to better use.

First off, let me be clear. I don’t have any special writing apps to craft posts for when I’m in a bus in the fog writing for my blog (or any other alliterative, Dr. Seuss-type wordplays). I’m using the basic Notes app that comes with all Apple devices these days. I’m not even bothering to check my spelling too much as autocorrect seems to be doing a pretty good job on its own. Now granted if my word choice ends up being a total crapfest, then I feel like I need to go back and update it.

Along with the Notes app comes the [WordPress app from Automattic](http://WordPress by Automattic https://appsto.re/us/i9Mau.i). It’s how I interface with my site from both my iPhone and iPad.

Second, I don’t find it necessary to spend every waking moment writing, although it is enjoyable. I’m sure if I tried hard enough I could find enough stuff to talk about during the day to write non stop for two people.

Third, what’s a blog post anyway but a digital journal entry? All I’m doing is putting my thoughts on digital paper and sharing them. I understand the recourse of the idea that once it’s on the Internet it’s there forever.

At some point, someone will want to sit next to me and hopefully I’ll be close to the end. There’s nothing I hate more than someone peeking over my shoulder trying to see what I’m up to. I get passing glances and whatnot, stuff happens. I can’t expect someone to never catch a glance of my kickass high score in Candy Crush.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to clear my autocorrect dictionary after all the new crap words it seems to have recorded after I wrote this.

PS: I might have seemed a bit ramble. That’s just how I write and think on a moments notice. I wrote this post more so to prove a point that to myself that I can write wherever I am. In the future, I think I’ll have to procure one of those keyboard iPad cases. A small screen makes my thumbs hurt.


Positioning for the Journey to Dreamland

I saw a rather interesting article this morning via the Wall Street Journal that talks about finding the perfect sleep position. I couldn’t help but think: “is there some mad science in here that will give me the answer to all things sleeping so I can sleep mad sleeps and wake up feeling like a million dollars?” Well, no. The only way to wake up feeling like a stack of cash is either a) have a million dollars or b) eat some of those crazy mushrooms the kids like.

Anyway, This article had some good points that I wanted to recap because it’s something I struggle with from time to time, and after adjusting my morning routine to better serve my daily writing goals, the best sleep I can get from the limited time I have is fine by me.

Looking back on even last night’s sleep, I started out on my side, and the article puts me in the majority with 57% of sleepers starting out that way. Sometimes, if I’m already pretty relaxed, I’ll start on my back, and let my eyes literally roll back into my head (weird I know). That’s something only 17% of people seem to do, and for those stomach sleepers out there, you’re the odder of the bunch at 11% for starting positions.

![2680866397_f6107a9fe0_o](https://john.ly/content/images/2015/01/2680866397_f6107a9fe0_o.jpg?resize=525%2C432&ssl=1)This doesn’t seem to be a good position to sleep in, but that’s just me. Ed Yourdon; flickr.
 

What I really found interesting is just in the next paragraph, the author talks about the variance in the amount of times people toss and turn during the night: as few as three times to as many as 36. I would have no way of knowing where I fall in that category unless I videotaped myself. I’m ok not knowing that much about my sleeping habits.

I whole-heartedly believe it’s important to make sure I am sleeping “properly” or as close to it as I can. I try to avoid pain areas in the sense that I’ll sleep on the opposite side if I’m favoring an area or if my back hurts, I’ll try to lay as flat as I can, to keep as much tension and pressure off it as possible.

If you have time—if you don’t, I think you should make time—go read the article form the Wall Street Journal. Sleep is important and making sure you’re getting the most out of it is crucial to morning success. Not all of us can just spring out of bed before the birds.


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