Positioning for the Journey to Dreamland

I saw a rather interesting article this morning via the Wall Street Journal that talks about finding the perfect sleep position. I couldn’t help but think: “is there some mad science in here that will give me the answer to all things sleeping so I can sleep mad sleeps and wake up feeling like a million dollars?” Well, no. The only way to wake up feeling like a stack of cash is either a) have a million dollars or b) eat some of those crazy mushrooms the kids like.

Anyway, This article had some good points that I wanted to recap because it’s something I struggle with from time to time, and after adjusting my morning routine to better serve my daily writing goals, the best sleep I can get from the limited time I have is fine by me.

Looking back on even last night’s sleep, I started out on my side, and the article puts me in the majority with 57% of sleepers starting out that way. Sometimes, if I’m already pretty relaxed, I’ll start on my back, and let my eyes literally roll back into my head (weird I know). That’s something only 17% of people seem to do, and for those stomach sleepers out there, you’re the odder of the bunch at 11% for starting positions.

![2680866397_f6107a9fe0_o](https://john.ly/content/images/2015/01/2680866397_f6107a9fe0_o.jpg?resize=525%2C432&ssl=1)This doesn’t seem to be a good position to sleep in, but that’s just me. Ed Yourdon; flickr.
 

What I really found interesting is just in the next paragraph, the author talks about the variance in the amount of times people toss and turn during the night: as few as three times to as many as 36. I would have no way of knowing where I fall in that category unless I videotaped myself. I’m ok not knowing that much about my sleeping habits.

I whole-heartedly believe it’s important to make sure I am sleeping “properly” or as close to it as I can. I try to avoid pain areas in the sense that I’ll sleep on the opposite side if I’m favoring an area or if my back hurts, I’ll try to lay as flat as I can, to keep as much tension and pressure off it as possible.

If you have time—if you don’t, I think you should make time—go read the article form the Wall Street Journal. Sleep is important and making sure you’re getting the most out of it is crucial to morning success. Not all of us can just spring out of bed before the birds.


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