Polymail

I’m super excited to write this blog post. I’m always interested in new mail clients (I miss Mailbox). When I found out Polymail dropped for both iOS and Mac, I jumped on it. Apparently so did everyone else, which lead to some problems.

If you’ve never heard of Polymail before, don’t feel bad. I didn’t hear about it until super recently, myself. Polymail has a super slick UI that doesn’t waste space with stuff you don’t need. It features killer email delegation and reminders (remember when Mailbox let you put off an email until a date in the future?), get information about the person you’re talking to, and keep all this organized and synced between all your devices.

Triage

Let’s talk about the follow-ups, first. I’m a huge fan of triaging tasks. If it’s not time-sensitive, it doesn’t need doing right now. Granted, if there’s nothing else that needs doing, that logic doesn’t apply. This is super helpful for those with noisy business inboxes where everyone and their grandmother is clamoring for your eyeballs to absorb their textual essences. Sorry grandma, I’ll take a look at that chain letter tomorrow at 4:30 PM.

You can choose to follow up on a conversation using one of the preset dates, be super noncommittal and say “read later”, or pick an arbitrary date in the future, because you’re a master of your schedule and you know you have sixteen time slots open right now between today and Christmas 2018. Those voids of sadness need filling!

On the flip side, you can remind yourself to follow up with someone else if they don’t read your email. This is a neat feature, but be careful. You can very easily become “that person” that everyone in your office hates. You know which person I’m talking about: “hey did you get my email?”

With great power comes great responsibility. Can I trust you to not abuse it?

Following Up

When you’re writing your digital prose to the person on the other end your email exchange, knowing who the heck they are is important. It’s even more important in cases like candidate screening or figuring out if the person is real, or not. Next time you get resumes for a job application, use their information Polymail will glean about them on your behalf.

The Downside of Cloud Sync

While writing this quick review and even attempting to use Polymail, I ran into two problems that I think are worth noting.

First, cloud sync is a very dangerous territory to enter if you’re not prepared. In the case of Polymail, I don’t think they were. The sign up process requires you give them access to your email accounts, which is fine. The problem here is, they do everything through their servers. The emails don’t go straight from gmail.com or outlook.com or your O365 account to the client. Nope. That’s too easy (or hard). I found this to be true when after about six hours, Polymail claimed I didn’t have new email. If only that was *really *the case.

Hi all! 👋 Initial mail syncing may take a little longer due to high traffic right now, but we're working on it. Thanks for your patience! 💌

— Polymail (@PolymailApp) July 21, 2016

That’s the tweet Polymail posted about the delays. Given I haven’t received more than one round of emails, I’d say it’s more than a delay.

My second problem is moving email accounts from one Polymail account to another. I wanted to use Polymail for work, too, so I created a work Polymail account. I also wanted to get my work email on my personal devices using Polymail. My routes were to use my work Polymail account everywhere else or move my work email to a personal Polymail account. I opted for the latter but ran into an issue.

My work email address is stuck in some sort of “account will be deleted” state that won’t progress. I didn’t think it’d take hours to delete an account, but I guess so. In the mean time, no work email via Polymail.

End of the Day

Originally I was pretty hesitant to jump in because of cloud syncing issues. This morning, I checked on it and everything seems to work well now and I was no longer getting the error in adding my work email account. So with all that being said, I’d definitely recommend Polymail.

You can pick up Polymail from polymail.io for the Mac and the App Store for iOS.


Goodbye Mailbox

When the Mailbox team joined Dropbox in 2013, we shared a passion for simplifying the way people work together. And solving the email problem seemed like a strong complement to the challenges Dropbox was already tackling.

But as we deepened our focus on collaboration, we realized there’s only so much an email app can do to fundamentally fix email. We’ve come to believe that the best way for us to improve people’s productivity going forward is to streamline the workflows that generate so much email in the first place.

In other words, it was only a matter of time. I enjoyed Mailbox. When I first discovered it and received my beta invite way back when, I was instantly hooked. The concept of being able to swipe emails around and either put them off until later or never have to deal with them at all was amazing. In my opinion, the best feature about the app was probably the reminder/scheduling swipe.

Deferring an email until “the evening” or at some point in the future when I could pay more attention to it rocked. I would use this almost on a daily basis with my personal emails.

Now, I guess I’m going back to the native Mail app, an app I never left on the Mac[footnote]Mailbox for Mac never was very good.[/footnote]. I could use something like Spark or Inbox. I’m not that resistant to change.

There’s one thing that sets this event up for another one of those things that can be classified by the phrase historically speaking, and Brent Simmons puts it quite succinctly:

https://twitter.com/brentsimmons/status/673921598240391168

Again… it was only a matter of time.

Brent goes on to say a few pretty key things:

When deciding whether or not you can trust an app to stick around, you can’t go by whether or not it was acquired.

This is so true. I like to use Nik as an example. A software company that developed photography editing tools, it was acquired by Google in September 2012 but is still going strong as a part of the Google Nik Collection. If you’re still not sure who Nik are, have you heard of Snapseed?

I’ll pour one out for Mailbox because I have some crappy beer in the fridge, but in a week, I’ll have already moved on.


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